Recruiting managers responsible for hiring frontline service, support, and sales employees consistently face challenges hiring the right people.  Customer facing jobs tend to have high attrition.  In addition, the hiring pace is fast and furious without much time to qualify each candidate.  In addition, hiring the wrong person can be expensive.  Based on FurstPerson’s research, the average cost of turnover for a customer facing contact center job $5,466. As a recruiting leader responsible for frontline job hiring, how do you make sure that you are hiring the right people into your organization?

Drawing from our eBook - 8 Steps to Better Frontline Service, Sales, and Support Hiring, we discuss each of these eight steps separately.

Understand and define the desired business outcomes!

Recruiting managers responsible for hiring frontline service, support, and sales employees consistently face challenges hiring the right people.  Customer facing jobs tend to have high attrition.  In addition, the hiring pace is fast and furious without much time to qualify each candidate.  In addition, hiring the wrong person can be expensive.  Based on FurstPerson’s research, the average cost of turnover for a customer facing contact center job $5,466. As a recruiting leader responsible for frontline job hiring, how do you make sure that you are hiring the right people into your organization?

Drawing from our eBook - 8 Steps to Better Frontline Service, Sales, and Support Hiring, we discuss each of these eight steps separately.

Understand and define the desired business outcomes!

To achieve great hiring results,hiring managers need to understand how the business drives revenue,margin,and profit. The goal of the hiring process is to hire employees who will perform their jobs in a manner that helps the business grow revenue, improve margin, and improve profit. Ultimately, financial improvement in the business determines whether the hiring process works or not. Being able to understand the business outcomes that leadership is driving and relate that back to the hiring process is a critical first step.

 

Examples of business outcomes include:

  • Does the business want to drive top line revenue?

  • Does the business want to reduce operating costs?

  • Does the business want to do both?

Recruiting managers who understand their business in financial terms are in a better position to establish a hiring process that helps propel their company forward profitably.  This creates a foundation that can be leveraged during ongoing discussions with the operational leaders and creates a shared language around the hiring process.

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In this blog series pulled from our eBook - Using an Interview to Select Frontline Job Candidates, we discuss types of interviews, delivery methods, and effectiveness.  In part 1 of blog series, we discussed types of interviews.  In part 2, we discuss ways to deliver an interview.  In part 3, we review standard benefits and challenges associated with the interview process.  In part 4, we discuss how the interview adds value.  In part 5, we discuss ways to improve your interview process.  In part 6, we discussed other methods for evaluating job candidates.  Today, we discuss the right role for the interview.

The right role for the interview

What is the right role for the interview then?  Given that the interview has reduced predictive power compared to other assessment options and that the interview does allow some key benefits with candidate engagement, the structured behavioral interview should be retained but moved to the end of the hiring process.  Hiring workflows should be designed to use lower cost and higher validity options (like the alternatives mentioned above) upfront and then finalize hiring decisions using interviews.  The goal of this process is to generate a lower cost but more predictive hiring model that reduces the chance of a bad hiring decision.  The model below provides an example of two hiring workflows:

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In the traditional interview model, the recruiters will need to interview 100 candidates that have successfully completed the application process.  In the technology led model, the recruiters will only need to interview 56 candidates.  Assuming that each interview is 60 minutes for preparation, discussion, and review, this saves $66,000 in opportunity cost (60 minutes x 44 candidates x $25/hour). 

In addition, the recruiters are interviewing a more qualified candidate pool.  And, because the candidate pool is better qualified because of the alternative assessments being used, the on boarding pass rate and show rate are also higher.  The net result is a better hiring yield at a lower cost.

 

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In this blog series pulled from our eBook - Using an Interview to Select Frontline Job Candidates, we discuss types of interviews, delivery methods, and effectiveness.  In part 1 of blog series, we discussed types of interviews.  In part 2, we discuss ways to deliver an interview.  In part 3, we review standard benefits and challenges associated with the interview process.  In part 4, we discuss how the interview adds value.  In part 5, we discuss ways to improve your interview process.  But besides the interview, how else can we evaluate job candidates?

Consider a Holistic Approach

While the interview does provide value, research suggests that other types of assessments offer better predictive power.  For the recruiting manager, that means screening out candidates who have a higher risk of attrition and poor job performance.  You may want to consider combining other types of candidate selection tools with your interview process.  Alternatives to consider:

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In this blog series pulled from our eBook - Using an Interview to Select Frontline Job Candidates, we discuss types of interviews, delivery methods, and effectiveness. In part 1 of blog series, we discussed types of interviews.  In part 2, we discuss ways to deliver an interview.  In part 3, we review standard benefits and challenges associated with the interview process.  In part 4, we discuss how the interview adds value.  But how can the interview process be improved?

Ways to improve the interview process

The interview can add value to the candidate selection process.  By addressing risk points in the interview process, you can improve the interview process and increase the predictive relationship between the interview and job performance. 

  • Provide interview training - Your interview process can fall apart when your interviewing team is not properly trained to conduct interviews, especially structured behavioral interviews which are the most predictive types of interviews. Make sure to create interview training that includes practice interview sessions with observers also rating the interview to drive consistency.
  • Align interview questions with job competencies - Do not allow random interview questions in your process.  Not only do they increase legal risk but they most likely do not add value. Make sure your interview questions are related to your job competencies. 
  • Track and store interview scores by interviewer - Many organizations do not systematically track and analyze interview results.  Make sure to track scores and then correlate them back to new hire job performance and retention.  If possible, track this data at the interviewer level.
  • Identify inconsistent interviewers - By tracking interview data and results, you can also look for interviewers that need coaching.

 

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In this blog series pulled from our eBook - Using an Interview to Select Frontline Job Candidates, we discuss types of interviews, delivery methods, and effectiveness. In part 1 of blog series, we discussed types of interviews.  In part 2, we discuss ways to deliver an interview.  In part 3, we review standard benefits and challenges associated with the interview process.  But how helpful is the interview in the selection process?

Does the interview add value?

If structured correctly, the interview can provide value.  Choice of interview format is the critical first decision. Research and practical results suggest that the structured behavioral interview is the right interview form to use. In addition, interviewers must receive consistent, constant training on interview administration. And, interviewers must undergo frequent quality assurance testing to make sure that the variance between interviewers is controlled.

In addition, including the interview, via phone or in-person, adds an ideal opportunity for candidate engagement.  Technology is allowing significant improvements to the hiring process. From removing cost, speeding processes, and improving overall hiring results, the gains from technology cannot be disputed.  However, recruiting is still a contact sport.  Candidates expect some type of personal interaction. 

Technology also allows disgruntled job candidates to post comments about negative experiences, blast unfriendly hiring processes, and quickly join forces against some companies.  The interview, by allowing interaction with the job candidate, creates an opportunity to diffuse some of those issues and engage the candidate.

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In this blog series pulled from our eBook - Using an Interview to Select Frontline Job Candidates, we discuss types of interviews, delivery methods, and effectiveness. In part 1 of blog series, we discussed types of interviews.  In part 2, we discuss ways to deliver an interview.  Now that we have introduced some common forms of interviews, we can review standard benefits and challenges associated with the interview process.

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In this blog series pulled from our eBook - Using an Interview to Select Frontline Job Candidates, we discuss types of interviews, delivery methods, and effectiveness.  In part 1 of blog series, we discussed types of interviews.  In part 2, we discuss ways to deliver an interview.  With technology, the interview delivery has changed over the years. 

Delivery Methods

Recruiters now have multiple options to manage the interview process.  Technology is creating multiple channels to deliver an interview.  Each option has trade-offs and should be carefully evaluated for the candidate experience, recruiter experience, effectiveness, and legal defensibility.  Keep in mind that the interview is a test just like a personality assessment, problem-solving test, or simulation. 

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Technology has made it easier to automate the interview process but keep in mind how the candidate may perceive the interview process.  

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The in-person interview is a common step in the hiring process.  In fact for many recruiting leaders, it is the only job candidate evaluation conducted for frontline employee hiring.  But how effective are interviews?  In this blog series pulled from our eBook - Using an Interview to Select Frontline Job Candidates, we discuss types of interviews, delivery methods, and effectiveness.

Types of Interviews

The interview can take multiple forms.  Before we discuss the interview's effectiveness, we should briefly understand the types of interviews being used by recruiting leaders today.  The interview is a selection process designed to predict future job performance on the basis of applicants’ oral responses to oral questions (McDaniel, Whetzel, Schmidt, & Maurer, 1994). 

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How does your interview compare to these types of interviews?  Unstructured, structured behavioral, or somewhere in the middle?

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Most call centers experience high turnover – as much as 20 percent – leading to decreased sales growth and an increase in the cost of replacing employees. Instead of hiring people with no connection to your products for customer service positions, companies should hire people who are already customers, according to research by Customer Service Investigator, a website that reviews software and helps companies find the right technology.

One reason that companies have trouble retaining call center employees is that they lack a clear career path. Kixeye, an internet game producer with its own customer service center, has found that hiring customers reduces turnover because they are more likely to want a long-term career with the company and seek out opportunities for advancement.

Another reason is that call center employees rarely feel a strong connection to their coworkers since many of them don’t intend for it to be a long-term job. Hiring customers ensures that employees have at least one thing in common – an appreciation for the product or service the company provides – which leads them to have higher rates of job satisfaction than non-customer employees.

Read the full article here to see how hiring customers leads to more motivated employees and reduces recruitment and training costs.

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According to IT consulting giant IDC, nearly 310,000 home agents will be working in the U.S. by the end of this year – up from 112,000 in 2007. Studies by other entities reveal similar growth in the contact center work-at-home arena. While it’s great that so many organizations are embracing the home agent model, most organizations aren’t realizing the full potential of their home agent program. Picture3

Why not? Because they insist on ‘tethering’ their home agents – adhering to a “hub & spoke” approach that places rigid geographic restrictions on the virtual initiative and keeps it from truly burgeoning. 

With today’s technology, a home agent located in a neighboring state or across the country can handle customer contacts just as easily and effectively as an onsite brick & mortar agent can. And the contact center can monitor, coach and manage the aforementioned home agent just as easily and effectively as it can a brick & mortar agent. 

Granted, managers and supervisors can’t exactly give far-away home agents an actual slap on the back for a job well done, or an actual kick in the pants for a job done atrociously, but that’s no reason to keep home agents confined to the same or similar zip code as the contact center’s. “Keep you enemies close and your home agents closer” is not a thing. It’s time contact centers stopped acting as if it were.

Reconsidering Traditional Policies

One of the main reasons why the vast majority of home agent programs are so local is that most contact centers don’t allow new agents to work from home until they have proven themselves in the brick & mortar center for at least six months. Such a policy is reasonable, but customer care organizations that want to separate themselves from the competition by building a truly talented and engaged frontline need to start being a little unreasonable. 

By requiring all agents to first work inside the facility prior to flying the contact center coop, companies limit themselves to a workforce comprised only of job candidates who reside in the immediate region. In contrast, by opening its arms to a nationwide workforce, a company exponentially increases the chances of finding top agent talent during the hiring process. And because adopting such a progressive hiring policy essentially means letting new-hires work remotely (few candidates are going to relocate across state lines for a agent position), the number of interested applicants will be even larger still, as workers everywhere are clamoring for work-at-home opportunities. 

In addition to attracting a much larger and talent-filled candidate pool, abandoning the hub & spoke mentality enables companies to retain valued and experienced brick & mortar agents who may have to move out of the region due to spouse’s/significant other’s job transfer, or to be closer to an ailing family member. I know of one large vacation and cruise company that changed its policies to hold on to three of the contact center’s best agents, all of whom had to move a few states away within a few months of one another for reasons already cited. Today, that company has a truly virtual workforce – roughly 60% of the company’s 500+ agents currently work from home, many of whom live nowhere near one of the company’s physical contact centers. 

But Does Truly Virtual Truly Work

Good question. If you ask one of the organizations that has already gone truly virtual, the answer is a resounding “YES”. All you need to do is take a look at one of the rapidly-growing virtual outsourcers, like Alpine Access or LiveOps, and you’ll see that the truly virtual model truly works. Via the use of web-based pre-hire assessment solutions, e-learning solutions, quality monitoring solutions and performance optimization solutions, these and other customer care organizations can effectively hire, train, evaluate and continuously improve agents who have never (or have rarely) set foot in one of the organization’s actual contact centers. And these agents are easily kept in the loop and connected to peers and supervisors via phone, email, chat, SMS, and video conferencing – technologies that ALL of us already use to do the majority of our communication today anyway.

And all of the alluring benefits of home agent initiatives – better employee engagement and retention, better performance, more flexible staffing, decreased facility expenses, smaller carbon footprint, et. al. – well, those benefits apply whether the home agents are working in a house down the block from the contact center or across a couple time zones. In fact, many of those benefits are increased once the organization lifts its geographic restrictions and sheds its short spokes. 

 


About Greg Levin

Greg Levin, Founder of Off Center, is one of the most unique and refreshing voices in the customer care industry. He has been researching, reporting on and satirizing contact center management and customer care since 1994 – first with ICMI, a leading consulting and training firm, and now as an independent writer, speaker and rabble rouser.

Greg offers a wide range of valuable and compelling resources – all aimed at educating, empowering and entertaining contact center professionals worldwide. Most notable is his popular weekly Off Center blog and his critically acclaimed ebook, Full Contact: Contact Center Practices and Strategies that Make an Impact.

To learn more about Greg and what he brings to the table, go to:

www.offcenterinsight.com.

 

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